Share this to:

Support & Insight for the Autumn of Life

A4 Study is 1st Step to an Alzheimer’s Vaccination

VIDEO+ARTICLE:

The A4 Study is a cutting-edge trial aimed at preventing Alzheimer’s. The clinical trial is testing normal adults who are at risk for the dementia. It is the first trial to inform healthy people of their risk in advance.

Read about the research. Watch Dr. Sperling explain its potential for a vaccination to prevent memory loss.


A cutting-edge clinical trial is testing whether early medical intervention in people at risk for Alzheimer’s can slow down progression of disease pathology before symptoms emerge, as outlined in Science Translational Medicine.

Continued below video…

For the first time, people with no Alzheimer’s disease symptoms are being told of their risk status before being asked to join the randomized controlled trial. As part of the overall prevention trial, Penn Medicine neurodegenerative ethics experts monitor how learning about their risk of developing Alzheimer’s impacts trial participants.

Alzheimer’s disease afflicts more than 13% of individuals over the age of 65, and remains one of the most feared consequences of aging.

“In order to ethically conduct a study where patients will learn they have a greater chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease dementia, we’ve integrated continual assessments of potential participants throughout the process, to ensure that they are ready to receive information about their amyloid status and aren’t having any adverse reactions after finding out,” said Jason Karlawish, MD, professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Karlawish directs the Penn Neurodegenerative Disease Ethics and Policy Program. “This study is an important step in determining the consequences of being tested for Alzheimer’s disease before the person has disabling cognitive impairments.”

The A4 Trial (Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease Trial) requires that patients enrolled must have one of the pathologies typically seen in Alzheimer’s disease dementia, which will be assessed using a brain PET scan that measures amyloid. Given that studies have shown that about one third of clinically normal older individuals have evidence of amyloid plaque accumulation but may not develop any cognitive symptoms within their lifetime, the patients who are enrolled in the trial based on positive amyloid results may or may not go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease dementia.

“In addition to the study’s primary aims — looking at whether early treatment can slow cognitive decline — we will carefully measure how disclosure impacts cognitive test performance, the perception of cognitive symptoms, quality of life and perceived risk of Alzheimer’s in participants with and without evidence of amyloid accumulation,” said Karlawish.


Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine


Journal Reference:

  1. R. A. Sperling, D. M. Rentz, K. A. Johnson, J. Karlawish, M. Donohue, D. P. Salmon, P. Aisen. The A4 Study: Stopping AD Before Symptoms Begin? Science Translational Medicine, 2014; 6 (228): 228fs13 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3007941
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
B. Berger

B. Berger

Visit Our Pages On:

Welcome

This site was inspired by my Mom’s autoimmune dementia.

It is a place where we separate out the wheat from the chaffe, the important articles & videos from each week’s river of news. With a new post on Alzheimer’s or dementia appearing on the internet every 7 minutes, the site’s focus on the best information has been a help to many over the past 15 years. Thanks to our many subscribers for your supportive feedback.

The site is dedicated to all those preserving the dignity of the community of people living with dementia.

Peter Berger, Editor

Related

Dr.%20Rudy%20Tanzi.jpeg
Does NAD+ Help with Alzheimer's?
Can NAD+ be helpful in preventing or containing Alzheimer's? Dr. Rudy Tanzi discusses his views on the subject.
Mediterranean Diet Ingredients
60,000 on Med Diet, 23% Less Dementia Risk
Eating a traditional Mediterranean-type diet – rich in foods such as seafood, fruit, and nuts – may help reduce the r...
150322-MayoDia.jpeg
The Mayo Clinic's Better Way to Test Dementia
Some Alzheimer’s tests cost thousands of dollars, some cost pennies. The trick is using the right tests at the right ...

Books

Amazon Books
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
News to Get at the Truth

Subscribe To Our Weekly Newsletter

Enjoy thought-provoking videos & articles
News to Get at the Truth

Subscribe To Our Weekly Newsletter