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Thought of the Week: Grandest Intention

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SARAH TRIAL
SARAH TRIAL
January 17, 2016 4:18 pm

My brother was diagnosed with the last stages of dementia over 6 years ago. He had 5 bypasses’, prior to this he was having mini strokes. My sister and I are feeding him 3 times a day giving him 2 of both immodium and pepto bismol, and he still has diarhea all the time, he has rages prior to sundown, and tracks poop all through his house. We have to bribe him to take showers, and even have a hospital chair in the shower. We urinates all over himself/and poops too. The VA said don’t bring him back (psyhyiatrist) because out of a 30, our brother was below a 7 in dementia. He repeats everything over and over. We are at wits end, My sister and I are both 60 and above, and this is killing us. We don’t know what to do.

Last edited 6 months ago by P. Berger
Anonymous
Anonymous
Reply to  SARAH TRIAL
December 11, 2023 3:52 pm

All I can say…you are not alone. Talk to you insurance, ask for home care!

Diana
Diana
Reply to  SARAH TRIAL
January 4, 2024 7:42 am

I’m in Australia, Dementia Australia are a fantastic resource, and would be able to give you advice. When my Mum’s health was suffering looking after Dad, she ended up in hospital, and Dad had to go into respite care. We just decided for Mum’s mental and physical health Dad needed to stay in the nursing home. It was the most painful experience for EVERYONE. But Mum couldn’t manage it on her own at all. We also have NDIS in Australia who provide different levels of care for people who are unable to look after themselves. What would happen to your brother if he were an only child? I don’t know where you are living but it seems to me the situation must have some government resources available or nursing home accommodation where your brother would get the best of care without it killing you and your sister…

Mayer
Mayer
December 15, 2023 6:44 am
Rating :
     

In the realm of benevolence, the smallest act of kindness, like a gentle breeze, holds greater value than the grandest intentions. As Oscar Wilde wisely noted, sincerity in actions speaks volumes. Speaking of value, in the digital realm, CapCut, the mod APK, adds a touch of creativity to your video editing pursuits.

Diana
Diana
January 4, 2024 7:35 am

After my father died, and when my mother couldn’t understand why hadn’t she seen him in a while, she came up with the idea that he was on a secret spy mission and couldn’t get in touch with her without putting her in harms way. I painfully went through the grief we both had about Dad’s death, and when we got to the bit about my father the Brigadier having had severe dementia and being in a home, Mum would settle because she realised Dad would not want to have lived like that. But the reality of it had no traction, and Mum would be asking me where Dad was again…WAS it “kind” to tell her “where” Dad was and allow her to grieve with me, or would it have been kinder to have just agreed with her Dad was on a secret mission. Mum did not have dementia, but could not “hold” this story, they had been together since they were 16, and I think she just couldn’t imagine living without him. I could have saved us a lot of grief if I had just gone along with her. What was the kindest way to respond? It’s too late now to change any of it, but similar ethical issues are bound to arise as I and my friends begin to get older and some are showing signs of dementia.

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P. Berger

This site was inspired by my Mom’s autoimmune dementia.

It is a place where we separate out the wheat from the chafe, the important articles & videos from each week’s river of news. Google gets a new post on Alzheimer’s or dementia every 7 minutes. That can overwhelm anyone looking for help. This site filters out, focuses on and offers only the best information. it has helped hundreds of thousands of people since it debuted in 2007. Thanks to our many subscribers for your supportive feedback.

The site is dedicated to all those preserving the dignity of the community of people living with dementia.

Peter Berger, Editor

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This site was inspired by my Mom’s autoimmune dementia.

It is a place where we separate out the wheat from the chafe, the important articles & videos from each week’s river of news. Google gets a new post on Alzheimer’s or dementia every 7 minutes. That can overwhelm anyone looking for help. This site filters out, focuses on and offers only the best information. it has helped hundreds of thousands of people since it debuted in 2007. Thanks to our many subscribers for your supportive feedback.

The site is dedicated to all those preserving the dignity of the community of people living with dementia.

Peter Berger, Editor

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This site was inspired by my Mom’s autoimmune dementia.

It is a place where we separate out the wheat from the chafe, the important articles & videos from each week’s river of news. Google gets a new post on Alzheimer’s or dementia every 7 minutes. That can overwhelm anyone looking for help. This site filters out, focuses on and offers only the best information. It has helped hundreds of thousands of people since it debuted in 2007. Thanks to our many subscribers for your supportive feedback.

The site is dedicated to all those preserving the dignity of the community of people living with dementia.

Peter Berger, Editor

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